Al Garner – The Word

Al Garner – The Word

Al Garner – The Word

Al Garner recorded in the 1950s, performing a swing, R&B brand of blues that left a small discography of raw sides for labels like Excello and Champion.

This 1998 outing for Black Magic brings him right up to date, finding him still in fine form. Produced by Fred James and featuring top notch vocal cameos from Roscoe Shelton, Earl Gaines, Jimmy Birdsong, Little Charles Walker, and Sonny Tyler, this brings light to a little known musical sidebar to the history of Music City that’s very soulful, indeed.

“Leaving Tennessee” attests to the fact that Al Garner’s vocal chops are firmly in tact. The Roadrunners have credits that included work with Canned Heat, John Mayall and others.

Blues is a genre and musical form originated by African Americans in the Deep South of the United States around the end of the 19th century. The genre developed from roots in African-American work songs and European-American folk music.

Blues incorporated spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts, chants, and rhymed simple narrative ballads.The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common.

Blue notes (or “worried notes”), usually thirds or fifths flattened in pitch, are also an important part of the sound. Blues shuffles or walking bass reinforce the trance-like rhythm and form a repetitive effect known as the groove.

Blues as a genre is also characterized by its lyrics, bass lines, and instrumentation. Early traditional blues verses consisted of a single line repeated four times.

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