Pink – Sober

Pink – Sober

Her career accolades include three Grammy Awards, a Brit Award, a Daytime Emmy Award and seven MTV Video Music Awards, including the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award. In 2009, Billboard named Pink the Pop Songs Artist of the Decade.

Pink was also the second most-played female solo artist in the United Kingdom during the 2000s decade, behind Madonna. VH1 ranked her number 10 on their list of the 100 Greatest Women in Music, while Billboard awarded her the Woman of the Year award in 2013. At the 63rd annual BMI Pop Awards, she received the BMI President’s Award for “her outstanding achievement in songwriting and global impact on pop culture and the entertainment industry.

Life and career

1979–1998: Early life and career beginnings
Alecia Beth Moore was born on September 8, 1979, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, to emergency room nurse Judith “Judy” Moore (née Kugeland insurance salesman James “Jim” Moore.

Her father is Catholic (of Irish and German descent) and her mother is Jewish (of Lithuanian Jewish and German Jewish descent). She has described herself as an “Irish-German-Lithuanian-Jew” and self-identifies as Jewish. Although a healthy baby at birth, she quickly developed asthma that plagued her through her early years. Pink attended Central Bucks High School West.

When Pink was a toddler, her parents began having marital problems, and before she was 10, her parents had divorced. Pink developed her voice early in life.

In high school, Pink joined her first band, Middleground, but it disbanded upon losing a battle of the bands competition. As a teenager, she wrote lyrics as an outlet for her feelings, and her mother commented, “Her initial writings were always very introspective. Some of it was very black, and very deep, almost worrisome.”

Pink began performing in Philadelphia clubs when she was about 14. She adopted her stagename, “Pink”, around this time. She had that nickname for quite some time by that point, and initially it had been “a mean thing”.

She had gotten that name from the character “Mr. Pink” in Quentin Tarantino’s film Reservoir Dogs. Pink has said, “I was extreme. I went through phases from skateboarder, to hip-hopper, to rave child, to lead singer in a band. I did it all, and all at the same time.”

At 14, she was convinced to audition to become a member of the all-female group Basic Instinct, and earned a spot in the lineup. Ultimately, the group disbanded without releasing any material. At 16, Pink and two other teenage girls, Stephanie Galligan and Chrissy Conway, formed the R&B group Choice.

A copy of their first song, “Key to My Heart”, was sent to LaFace Records in Atlanta, Georgia, where L.A. Reid overheard it and arranged for the group to fly there so he could see them perform. After that, he signed them to a record deal. Since the three girls were under 18 at the time, their parents had to cosign the contract.

The group relocated to Atlanta and recorded an album, which was never released, and “Key to My Heart” appeared on the soundtrack to the 1996 film Kazaam. During a Christmas party, Reid gave Pink an ultimatum: go solo or go home. Choice disbanded in 1998.

Legacy

Pink has been credited for breaking boundaries and pushing the envelope throughout her career. She is regarded as the “most trailblazing artist” of her pop generation. Robert Hilburn of the Los Angeles Times says, “Pink stood up for her music, broke the music industry’s mold and scored a breakout hit, challenging a school of teen singers to find their own sounds as well.”

He adds, “[Pink] also started a race among other teen pop stars like Christina Aguilera to add substance to their own sound.” Ann Powers refers to her as a “powerhouse vocalist”, stating her mix of rebellion, emotional rawness, humor, and “infectious” dance beats created “a model for the mashup approach of latter-day divas such as Katy Perry, Kesha, and even Rihanna.

“Rob Sheffield of Rolling Stone commented: “I think people respond to her sense of independence and dedication. It inspires people… This is a prolific pop artist who is sometimes famous and successful, sometimes obscure, who nonetheless keeps making her own kind of music.”

James Montgomery of MTV describes her as “a fabulously fearless pop artist” who can “out-sing almost anyone out there. She can out-crazy Gaga or Lily. She’s the total pop-star package, everything you’d want in a singer/entertainer/icon.

And still, she remains oddly off the radar. Such is the price of busting borders”.Entertainment Weekly said: “She essentially invented the whole modern wave of Pop Diva Domination: You can draw a straight line from “Get This Party Started” to Katy Perry, Kesha, pre-messianic Lady Gaga, and post-weird Rihanna.

“Glamour Magazine wrote: “When Pennsylvania-born Alecia Moore debuted in 2000, pop was dominated by long-locked blonds like Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera and Jessica Simpson. Pink changed the game. Without her, the last 13-years of big-voiced, tough chick music is hard to imagine.”

Following her performance at the American Music Awards of 2012, LZ Granderson of CNN wrote: “… our culture’s biggest sin may well be the auto-tuned syrup we’ve allowed to dominate the pop charts.

All-time chart records are handed to vacuous acts such as the Black Eyed Peas and singing awards are given to vocal lightweights such as Taylor Swift […] But thank God for Pink. […] While Christina Aguilera has a tendency to oversing, Britney Spears can’t sing, and Lauryn Hill sorta stopped singing, Pink has managed to carve a brilliant 13-year-career by being something that is incredibly rare these days—an artist.”

British soul singer Adele considers Pink’s performance at Brixton Academy in London as one of “the most defining moments” in her life, saying “It was the Missundaztood record, so I was about 13 or 14. I had never heard, being in the room, someone sing like that live. I remember sort of feeling like I was in a wind tunnel, her voice just hitting me. It was incredible.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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