Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble – Texas Flood

Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble – Texas Flood

Chris Gill of Guitar World commented: “Stevie Ray Vaughan’s guitar tone was as dry as a San Antonio summer and as sparkling clean as a Dallas debutante, the product of the natural sound of amps with ample clean headroom. However, Vaughan occasionally used pedals to augment his sound, mainly to boost the signal, although he occasionally employed a rotating speaker cabinet and wah pedals for added textural flair.”

Vaughan received several music awards during his lifetime and posthumously. In 1983, readers of Guitar Player voted him as Best New Talent and Best Electric Blues Guitar Player. In 1984, the Blues Foundation named him Entertainer of the Year and Blues Instrumentalist of the Year, and in 1987 Performance Magazine honored him with Rhythm and Blues Act of the Year.

Earning six Grammy Awards and ten Austin Music Awards, he was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2000 and the Musicians Hall of Fame in 2014. Rolling Stone ranked Vaughan as the twelfth greatest guitarist of all time. Also, on December 16, 2014, he was named as one of eight artists inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a part of the 2015 class.

Musical style

Vaughan’s music took root in blues, rock, and jazz. He was influenced by the work of artists such as Jimi Hendrix, Albert King, B.B. King, Freddie King, Albert Collins, Johnny “Guitar” Watson, Buddy Guy, Howlin’ Wolf, Otis Rush, Guitar Slim, Chuck Berry, and Muddy Waters. According to nightclub owner Clifford Antone, who opened Antone’s in 1975, Vaughan jammed with Albert King at Antone’s in July 1977 and almost “scared him to death”, saying that “it was the best I’ve ever saw Albert or the best I ever saw Stevie”.

He was also influenced by jazz guitarists like Django Reinhardt, Wes Montgomery, Kenny Burrell, and George Benson. While Albert King had a substantial influence on Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix was Vaughan’s greatest inspiration.

Vaughan declared: “I love Hendrix for so many reasons. He was so much more than just a blues guitarist–he played damn well any kind of guitar he wanted. In fact I’m not sure if he even played the guitar–he played music.”

Vaughan owed his guitar technique in large part to Lonnie Mack, who Vaughan observed in live performance as “ahead of his time”. In 1987, Vaughan listed Mack first among the guitarists he listened to, both as a youngster and as an adult.

Mack recalled his first meeting with Vaughan in 1978: “We was in Texas looking for pickers, and we went out to see the Thunderbirds. Jimmie was saying, ‘Man, you gotta hear my little brother. He plays all your [songs].’ He was playing a little place called the Rome Inn, and we went over there and checked him out.

As it would be, when I walked in the door, he was playing ‘Wham!’ And I said, ‘Dadgum.’ He was playing it right. I’d been playing it wrong for a long time and needed to go back and listen to my original record. That was in ’78, I believe.” Vaughan owed part of his enduring style—especially his use of tremolo picking and vibrato—to Mack.

He acknowledged that Mack taught him to “play guitar from the heart”. Vaughan’s relationship with another Texas blues legend, Johnny Winter, was a little more complex. Although they met several times, and often played sessions with the same musicians or even performed the same material, as in the case of Boot Hill, Vaughan always refrained from acknowledging Winter in any form.

In his biography, “Raisin’ Cain”, Winter says that he was unnerved after reading Vaughan stating in an interview that he never met or knew Johnny Winter. “We even played together over at Tommy Shannon’s house one time.”

Vaughan settled the issue in 1988 on the occasion of a Blues Festival in Europe where both he and Winter were on the bill, explaining that he has been misquoted and that “Every musician in Texas knows Johnny and has learned something from him”. Asked to compare their playing styles in an interview in 2010, Winter admitted that “mine’s a little bit rawer, I think.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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