Waltz of the butterfly

Waltz of the butterfly

In the US around 1911 the word “tango” was often applied to dances in a 2/4 or 4/4 rhythm such as the one-step. The term was fashionable and did not indicate that tango steps would be used in the dance, although they might be.

Tango music was sometimes played, but at a rather fast tempo. Instructors of the period would sometimes refer to this as a “North American tango”, versus the so-called “Argentine Tango”.

By 1914 more authentic tango stylings were soon developed,[which?] along with some variations like Albert Newman’s “Minuet” tango.

In Argentina, the onset in 1929 of the Great Depression, and restrictions introduced after the overthrow of the Hipólito Yrigoyen government in 1930 caused tango to decline. Its fortunes were reversed as tango became widely fashionable and a matter of national pride under the government of Juan Perón.

Tango declined again in the 1950s as a result of economic depression and the banning of public gatherings by the military dictatorships; male-only Tango practice—the custom at the time—was considered “public gathering”. That, indirectly, boosted the popularity of rock and roll because, unlike Tango, it did not require such gatherings.

In 2009, the tango was added to the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists.

The tango consists of a variety of styles that developed in different regions and eras of Argentina as well as in other locations around the world. The dance developed in response to many cultural elements, such as the crowding of the venue and even the fashions in clothing.

The styles are mostly danced in either open embrace, where lead and follow have space between their bodies, or close embrace, where the lead and follow connect either chest-to-chest (Argentine tango) or in the upper thigh, hip area (American and International tango).

Different styles of Tango are:

Tango Vals
Tango argentino
Tango canyengue
Tango Oriental Uruguayan tango
Tango liso
Tango salon
Tango orillero
Tango camacupense (Angola)
Tango milonguero (Tango apilado)
Tango Nuevo (New Tango)
Contact tango
Show Tango (also known as fantasia)
Ballroom tango
Finnish tango

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pages: 1 2

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,836 other subscribers

You must be logged in to post a comment Login